Engrossed Senate Bill 5476 - Session Law Chapter 311 Year 2021

Source

Section 1

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 71.24. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. The authority, in collaboration with the substance use recovery services advisory committee established in subsection (2) of this section, shall establish a substance use recovery services plan. The purpose of the plan is to implement measures to assist persons with substance use disorder in accessing outreach, treatment, and recovery support services that are low barrier, person centered, informed by people with lived experience, and culturally and linguistically appropriate. The plan must articulate the manner in which continual, rapid, and widespread access to a comprehensive continuum of care will be provided to all persons with substance use disorder.

  2. [Empty]

    1. The authority shall establish the substance use recovery services advisory committee to collaborate with the authority in the development and implementation of the substance use recovery services plan under this section. The authority must appoint members to the advisory committee who have relevant background related to the needs of persons with substance use disorder. The advisory committee shall be reflective of the community of individuals living with substance use disorder, including persons who are Black, indigenous, and persons of color, persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, as well as persons who represent the unique needs of rural communities. The advisory committee shall be convened and chaired by the director of the authority, or the director's designee. In addition to the member from the authority, the advisory committee shall include:

      1. One member and one alternate from each of the two largest caucuses of the house of representatives, as appointed by the speaker of the house of representatives;

      2. One member and one alternate from each of the two largest caucuses of the senate, as appointed by the president of the senate;

      3. One representative of the governor's office;

      4. At least one adult in recovery from substance use disorder who has experienced criminal legal consequences as a result of substance use;

    2. At least one youth in recovery from substance use disorder who has experienced criminal legal consequences as a result of substance use;

    1. One expert from the addictions, drug, and alcohol institute at the University of Washington;

    2. One outreach services provider;

    3. One substance use disorder treatment provider;

     ix. One peer recovery services provider;
    
    1. One recovery housing provider;
    1. One expert in serving persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions;

    2. One expert in antiracism and equity in health care delivery systems;

    3. One employee who provides substance use disorder treatment or services as a member of a labor union representing workers in the behavioral health field;

    4. One representative of the association of Washington health plans;

    5. One expert in diversion from the criminal legal system to community-based care for persons with substance use disorder;

    6. One representative of public defenders;

    7. One representative of prosecutors;

    8. One representative of sheriffs and police chiefs;

    9. One representative of a federally recognized tribe; and

    10. One representative of local governments.

    1. The advisory committee may create subcommittees with expanded participation.

    2. In its collaboration with the advisory committee to develop the substance use recovery services plan, the authority must give due consideration to the recommendations of the advisory committee. If the authority determines that any of the advisory committee's recommendations are not feasible to adopt and implement, the authority must notify the advisory committee and offer an explanation.

    3. The advisory committee must convene as necessary for the development of the substance use recovery services plan and to provide consultation and advice related to the development and adoption of rules to implement the plan. The advisory committee must convene to monitor implementation of the plan and advise the authority.

  3. The plan must consider:

    1. The points of intersection that persons with substance use disorder have with the health care, behavioral health, criminal, civil legal, and child welfare systems as well as the various locations in which persons with untreated substance use disorder congregate, including homeless encampments, motels, and casinos;

    2. New community-based care access points, including crisis stabilization services and the safe station model in partnership with fire departments;

    3. Current regional capacity for substance use disorder assessments, including capacity for persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, each of the American society of addiction medicine levels of care, and recovery support services;

    4. Barriers to accessing the existing behavioral health system and recovery support services for persons with untreated substance use disorder, especially indigent youth and adult populations, persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, and populations chronically exposed to criminal legal system responses, and possible innovations that could improve the quality and accessibility of care for those populations;

    5. Evidence-based, research-based, and promising treatment and recovery services appropriate for target populations, including persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions;

    6. Options for leveraging existing integrated managed care, medicaid waiver, American Indian or Alaska Native fee-for-service behavioral health benefits, and private insurance service capacity for substance use disorders, including but not limited to coordination with managed care organizations, behavioral health administrative services organizations, the Washington health benefit exchange, accountable communities of health, and the office of the insurance commissioner;

    7. Framework and design assistance for jurisdictions to assist in compliance with the requirements of RCW 10.31.110 for diversion of individuals with complex or co-occurring behavioral health conditions to community-based care whenever possible and appropriate, and identifying resource gaps that impede jurisdictions in fully realizing the potential impact of this approach;

    8. The design of recovery navigator programs in section 2 of this act, including reporting requirements by behavioral health administrative services organizations to monitor the effectiveness of the programs and recommendations for program improvement;

    9. The proposal of a funding framework in which, over time, resources are shifted from punishment sectors to community-based care interventions such that community-based care becomes the primary strategy for addressing and resolving public order issues related to behavioral health conditions;

    10. Strategic grant making to community organizations to promote public understanding and eradicate stigma and prejudice against persons with substance use disorder by promoting hope, empathy, and recovery;

    11. Recommendations for diversion to community-based care for individuals with substance use disorders, including persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, across all points of the sequential intercept model;

    12. Recommendations regarding the appropriate criminal legal system response, if any, to possession of controlled substances;

    13. Recommendations regarding the collection and reporting of data that identifies the number of persons law enforcement officers and prosecutors engage related to drug possession and disparities across geographic areas, race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, and income. The recommendations shall include, but not be limited to, the number and rate of persons who are diverted from charges to recovery navigator services or other services, who receive services and what type of services, who are charged with simple possession, and who are taken into custody; and

    14. The design of a mechanism for referring persons with substance use disorder or problematic behaviors resulting from substance use into the supportive services described in section 2 of this act.

  4. The plan and related rules adopted by the authority must give due consideration to persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions and the needs of youth. The plan must include the substance use outreach, treatment, and recovery services outlined in sections 2 through 4 of this act which must be available in or accessible by all jurisdictions. These services must be equitably distributed across urban and rural settings. If feasible and appropriate, service initiation shall be made available on demand through 24-hour, seven days a week peer recovery coach response, behavioral health walk-in centers, or other innovative rapid response models. These services must, at a minimum, incorporate the following principles: Establish low barriers to entry and reentry; improve the health and safety of the individual; reduce the harm of substance use and related activity for the public; include integrated and coordinated services; incorporate structural competency and antiracism; use noncoercive methods of engaging and retaining people in treatment and recovery services, including contingency management; consider the unique needs of rural communities; and have a focus on services that increase social determinants of health.

  5. In developing the plan, the authority shall:

    1. Align the components of the plan with previous and ongoing studies, plans, and reports, including the Washington state opioid overdose and response plan, published by the authority, the roadmap to recovery planning grant strategy being developed by the authority, and plans associated with federal block grants; and

    2. Coordinate its work with the efforts of the blue ribbon commission on the intersection of the criminal justice and behavioral health crisis systems and the crisis response improvement strategy committee established in chapter . . ., Laws of 2021 (Engrossed Second Substitute House Bill No. 1477).

  6. The authority must submit a preliminary report by December 1, 2021, regarding progress toward the substance use recovery services plan. The authority must submit the final substance use recovery services plan to the governor and the legislature by December 1, 2022. After submitting the plan, the authority shall adopt rules and enter into contracts with providers to implement the plan by December 1, 2023. In addition to seeking public comment under chapter 34.05 RCW, the authority must adopt rules in accordance with the recommendations of the substance use recovery services advisory committee as provided in subsection (2) of this section.

  7. In consultation with the substance use recovery services advisory committee, the authority must submit a report on the implementation of the substance use recovery services plan to the appropriate committees of the legislature and governor by December 1st of each year, beginning in 2023. This report shall include progress on the substance use disorder continuum of care, including availability of outreach, treatment, and recovery support services statewide.

  8. For the purposes of this section, "recovery support services" means a collection of resources that sustain long-term recovery from substance use disorder, including for persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, recovery housing, permanent supportive housing, employment and education pathways, peer supports and recovery coaching, family education, technological recovery supports, transportation and child care assistance, and social connectedness.

  9. This section expires December 31, 2026.

Section 2

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 71.24. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Each behavioral health administrative services organization shall establish a recovery navigator program. The program shall provide community-based outreach, intake, assessment, and connection to services and, as appropriate, long-term intensive case management and recovery coaching services, to youth and adults with substance use disorder, including for persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, who are referred to the program from diverse sources and shall facilitate and coordinate connections to a broad range of community resources for youth and adults with substance use disorder, including treatment and recovery support services.

  2. The authority shall establish uniform program standards for behavioral health administrative services organizations to follow in the design of their recovery navigator programs. The uniform program standards must be modeled upon the components of the law enforcement assisted diversion program and address project management, field engagement, biopsychosocial assessment, intensive case management and care coordination, stabilization housing when available and appropriate, and, as necessary, legal system coordination. The authority must adopt the uniform program standards from the components of the law enforcement assisted diversion program to accommodate an expanded population of persons with substance use disorders, including persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, and allow for referrals from a broad range of sources. In addition to accepting referrals from law enforcement, the uniform program standards must provide guidance for accepting referrals on behalf of persons with substance use disorders, including persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, from various sources including, but not limited to, self-referral, family members of the individual, emergency department personnel, persons engaged with serving homeless persons, including those living unsheltered or in encampments, fire department personnel, emergency medical service personnel, community-based organizations, members of the business community, harm reduction program personnel, faith-based organization staff, and other sources within the criminal legal system, as outlined within the sequential intercept model. In developing response time requirements within the statewide program standards, the authority shall require, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, that responses to referrals from law enforcement occur immediately for in-custody referrals and shall strive for rapid response times to other appropriate settings such as emergency departments.

  3. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall provide funding to each behavioral health administrative services organization for the development of its recovery navigator program. Before receiving funding for implementation and ongoing administration, each behavioral health administrative services organization must submit a program plan that demonstrates the ability to fully comply with statewide program standards. The authority shall establish a schedule for the regular review of behavioral health administrative services organizations' programs. The authority shall arrange for technical assistance to be provided by the LEAD national support bureau to all behavioral health administrative services organizations.

  4. Each behavioral health administrative services organization must have a substance use disorder regional administrator for its recovery navigator program. The regional administrator shall be responsible for assuring compliance with program standards, including staffing standards. Each recovery navigator program must maintain a sufficient number of appropriately trained personnel for providing intake and referral services, conducting comprehensive biopsychosocial assessments, providing intensive case management services, and making warm handoffs to treatment and recovery support services along the continuum of care. Program staff must include people with lived experience with substance use disorder to the extent possible. The substance use disorder regional administrator must assure that staff who are conducting intake and referral services and field assessments are paid a livable and competitive wage and have appropriate initial training and receive continuing education.

  5. Each recovery navigator program must submit quarterly reports to the authority with information identified by the authority and the substance use recovery services advisory committee. The reports must be provided to the substance use recovery services advisory committee for discussion at meetings following the submission of the reports.

Section 3

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 71.24. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall establish a grant program to:

    1. Provide treatment services for low-income individuals with substance use disorder who are not eligible for medical assistance programs under chapter 74.09 RCW, with priority for the use of the funds for very low-income individuals; and

    2. Provide treatment services that are not eligible for federal matching funds to individuals who are enrolled in medical assistance programs under chapter 74.09 RCW.

  2. In establishing the grant program, the authority shall consult with the substance use recovery services advisory committee established in section 1 of this act, behavioral health administrative services organizations, managed care organizations, and regional behavioral health providers to adopt regional standards that are consistent with the substance use recovery services plan developed under section 1 of this act to provide sufficient access for youth and adults to meet each region's needs for:

    1. Opioid use disorder treatment programs;

    2. Low-barrier buprenorphine clinics;

    3. Outpatient substance use disorder treatment;

    4. Withdrawal management services, including both subacute and medically managed withdrawal management;

    5. Secure withdrawal management and stabilization services;

    6. Inpatient substance use disorder treatment services;

    7. Inpatient co-occurring disorder treatment services; and

    8. Behavioral health crisis walk-in and drop-off services.

  3. Funds in the grant program must be used to reimburse providers for the provision of services to individuals identified in subsection (1) of this section. The authority may use the funds to support evidence-based practices and promising practices that are not reimbursed by medical assistance or private insurance, including contingency management. In addition, funds may be used to provide assistance to organizations to establish or expand services as reasonably necessary and feasible to increase the availability of services to achieve the regional access standards developed under subsection (2) of this section, including such items as training and recruitment of personnel, reasonable modifications to existing facilities to accommodate additional clients, start-up funding, and similar forms of assistance. Funds may not be used to support the ongoing operational costs of a provider or organization, except in relation to payments for specific service encounters with an individual identified in subsection (1) of this section or for noninsurance reimbursable services.

  4. The authority must establish regional access standards under subsection (2) of this section, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, by January 1, 2023, and begin distributing grant funds by March 1, 2023.

Section 4

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 71.24. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall establish the expanded recovery support services program to increase access to recovery services for individuals in recovery from substance use disorder.

  2. In establishing the program, the authority shall consult with the substance use recovery services advisory committee established in section 1 of this act, behavioral health administrative services organizations, regional behavioral health providers, and regional community organizations that support individuals in recovery from substance use disorders, including individuals with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, to adopt regional expanded recovery plans that are consistent with the substance use recovery services plan developed under section 1 of this act to provide sufficient access for youth and adults to meet each region's needs for:

    1. Recovery housing;

    2. Employment pathways, support, training, and job placement, including evidence-based supported employment program services;

    3. Education pathways, including recovery high schools and collegiate recovery programs;

    4. Recovery coaching and substance use disorder peer support;

    5. Social connectedness initiatives, including the recovery café model;

    6. Family support services, including family reconciliation services;

    7. Technology-based recovery support services;

    8. Transportation assistance; and

    9. Legal support services.

  3. Funds in the expanded recovery support services program must be used to reimburse providers for the provision of services to individuals in recovery from substance use disorders, including individuals with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions. In addition, the funds may be used to provide assistance to organizations to establish or expand recovery support services as reasonably necessary and feasible to increase the availability of services to achieve the regional expanded recovery plans developed under subsection (2) of this section, including such items as training and recruitment of personnel, reasonable modifications to existing facilities to accommodate additional clients, and similar forms of assistance.

  4. The authority must establish regional expanded recovery plans under subsection (2) of this section, subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, by January 1, 2023, and begin distributing grant funds by March 1, 2023.

Section 5

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 71.24. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall establish a homeless outreach stabilization transition program to expand access to modified assertive community treatment services provided by multidisciplinary behavioral health outreach teams to serve people who are living with serious substance use disorders or co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, are experiencing homelessness, and whose severity of behavioral health symptom acuity level creates a barrier to accessing and receiving conventional behavioral health services and outreach models.

    1. In establishing the program, the authority shall consult with behavioral health outreach organizations who have experience delivering this service model in order to establish program guidelines regarding multidisciplinary team staff types, service intensity and quality fidelity standards, and criteria to ensure programs are reaching the appropriate priority population.

    2. Funds for the homeless outreach stabilization transition program must be used to reimburse organizations for the provision of multidisciplinary outreach services to individuals who are living with substance use disorders or co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders and are experiencing homelessness or transitioning from homelessness to housing. The funds may be used to provide assistance to organizations to establish or expand services as reasonably necessary to create a homeless outreach stabilization transition program, including items such as training and recruitment of personnel, outreach and engagement resources, client engagement and health supplies, medications for people who do not have access to insurance, and similar forms of assistance.

    3. The authority must establish one or more homeless outreach stabilization transition programs by January 1, 2024, and begin distributing grant funds by March 1, 2024.

  2. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall establish a project for psychiatric outreach to the homeless program to expand access to behavioral health medical services for people who are experiencing homelessness and living in permanent supportive housing.

    1. In establishing the program, the authority shall consult with behavioral health medical providers, homeless service providers, and permanent supportive housing providers that support people living with substance use disorders, co-occurring substance use and mental health conditions, and people who are currently or have formerly experienced homelessness.

    2. Funds for the project for psychiatric outreach to the homeless program must be used to reimburse organizations for the provision of medical services to individuals who are living with or in recovery from substance use disorders, co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders, or other behavioral and physical health conditions. Organizations must provide medical services to people who are experiencing homelessness or are living in permanent supportive housing and would be at risk of homelessness without access to appropriate services. The funds may be used to provide assistance to organizations to establish or expand behavioral health medical services as reasonably necessary to create a project for psychiatric outreach to the homeless program, including items such as training and recruitment of personnel, outreach and engagement resources, medical equipment and health supplies, medications for people who do not have access to insurance, and similar forms of assistance.

    3. The authority must establish one or more projects for psychiatric outreach to the homeless programs by January 1, 2024, and begin distributing grant funds by March 1, 2024.

  3. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall increase contingency management resources for opioid treatment networks that are serving people living with co-occurring stimulant use and opioid use disorder.

  4. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall develop a plan for implementing a comprehensive statewide substance misuse prevention effort. The plan must be completed by January 1, 2024.

  5. Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the authority shall administer a competitive grant process to broaden existing local community coalition efforts to prevent substance misuse by increasing relevant protective factors while decreasing risk factors. Coalitions are to be open to all stakeholders interested in substance misuse prevention, including, but not limited to, representatives from people in recovery, law enforcement, education, behavioral health, parent organizations, treatment organizations, organizations serving youth, prevention professionals, and business.

Section 7

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 43.101. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Beginning July 1, 2022, all law enforcement personnel required to complete basic law enforcement training under RCW 43.101.200 must receive training on law enforcement interaction with persons with substance use disorders, including persons with co-occurring substance use disorders and mental health conditions, and referral to treatment and recovery services and the unique referral processes for youth, as part of the basic law enforcement training. The training must be developed by the commission in collaboration with the University of Washington behavioral health institute and agencies that have expertise in the area of working with persons with substance use disorders, including law enforcement diversion of such individuals to community-based care. In developing the training, the commission must also examine existing courses certified by the commission that relate to persons with a substance use disorder, and should draw on existing training partnerships with the Washington association of sheriffs and police chiefs.

  2. The training must consist of classroom instruction or internet instruction and shall replicate likely field situations to the maximum extent possible. The training should include, at a minimum, core instruction in all of the following:

    1. Proper procedures for referring persons to the recovery navigator program in accordance with section 2 of this act;

    2. The etiology of substance use disorders, including the role of trauma;

    3. Barriers to treatment engagement experienced by many with such disorders who have contact with the legal system;

    4. How to identify indicators of substance use disorder and how to respond appropriately in a variety of common situations;

    5. Conflict resolution and de-escalation techniques for potentially dangerous situations involving persons with a substance use disorder;

    6. Appropriate language usage when interacting with persons with a substance use disorder;

    7. Alternatives to lethal force when interacting with potentially dangerous persons with a substance use disorder;

    8. The principles of recovery and the multiple pathways to recovery; and

    9. Community and state resources available to serve persons with substance use disorders and how these resources can be best used by law enforcement to support persons with a substance use disorder in their communities.

  3. In addition to incorporation into the basic law enforcement training under RCW 43.101.200, training must be made available to law enforcement agencies, through electronic means, for use during in-service training.

Section 8

This section modifies existing section 69.50.4011. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Except as authorized by this chapter, it is unlawful for :

    1. Any person to createor deliver a counterfeit substance**; or**

    2. Any person to knowingly possess a counterfeit substance.

  2. Any person who violates subsection (1)(a) of this section with respect to:

    1. A counterfeit substance classified in Schedule I or II which is a narcotic drug, or flunitrazepam classified in Schedule IV, is guilty of a class B felony and upon conviction may be imprisoned for not more than ten years, fined not more than twenty-five thousand dollars, or both;

    2. A counterfeit substance which is methamphetamine, is guilty of a class B felony and upon conviction may be imprisoned for not more than ten years, fined not more than twenty-five thousand dollars, or both;

    3. Any other counterfeit substance classified in Schedule I, II, or III, is guilty of a class C felony punishable according to chapter 9A.20 RCW;

    4. A counterfeit substance classified in Schedule IV, except flunitrazepam, is guilty of a class C felony punishable according to chapter 9A.20 RCW;

    5. A counterfeit substance classified in Schedule V, is guilty of a class C felony punishable according to chapter 9A.20 RCW.

  3. A violation of subsection (1)(b) of this section is a misdemeanor. The prosecutor is encouraged to divert such cases for assessment, treatment, or other services.

Section 9

This section modifies existing section 69.50.4013. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. It is unlawful for any person to knowingly possess a controlled substance unless the substance was obtained directly from, or pursuant to, a valid prescription or order of a practitioner while acting in the course of his or her professional practice, or except as otherwise authorized by this chapter.

  2. Except as provided in RCW 69.50.4014, any person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.

  3. The prosecutor is encouraged to divert cases under this section for assessment, treatment, or other services.

  4. [Empty]

    1. The possession, by a person twenty-one years of age or older, of useable marijuana, marijuana concentrates, or marijuana-infused products in amounts that do not exceed those set forth in RCW 69.50.360(3) is not a violation of this section, this chapter, or any other provision of Washington state law.

    2. The possession of marijuana, useable marijuana, marijuana concentrates, and marijuana-infused products being physically transported or delivered within the state, in amounts not exceeding those that may be established under RCW 69.50.385(3), by a licensed employee of a common carrier when performing the duties authorized in accordance with RCW 69.50.382 and 69.50.385, is not a violation of this section, this chapter, or any other provision of Washington state law.

  5. [Empty]

    1. The delivery by a person twenty-one years of age or older to one or more persons twenty-one years of age or older, during a single twenty-four hour period, for noncommercial purposes and not conditioned upon or done in connection with the provision or receipt of financial consideration, of any of the following marijuana products, is not a violation of this section, this chapter, or any other provisions of Washington state law:

      1. One-half ounce of useable marijuana;

      2. Eight ounces of marijuana-infused product in solid form;

      3. Thirty-six ounces of marijuana-infused product in liquid form; or

      4. Three and one-half grams of marijuana concentrates.

    2. The act of delivering marijuana or a marijuana product as authorized under this subsection (5) must meet one of the following requirements:

      1. The delivery must be done in a location outside of the view of general public and in a nonpublic place; or

      2. The marijuana or marijuana product must be in the original packaging as purchased from the marijuana retailer.

  6. No person under twenty-one years of age may possess, manufacture, sell, or distribute marijuana, marijuana-infused products, or marijuana concentrates, regardless of THC concentration. This does not include qualifying patients with a valid authorization.

  7. The possession by a qualifying patient or designated provider of marijuana concentrates, useable marijuana, marijuana-infused products, or plants in accordance with chapter 69.51A RCW is not a violation of this section, this chapter, or any other provision of Washington state law.

Section 10

This section modifies existing section 69.50.4014. Here is the modified chapter for context.

Except as provided in RCW 69.50.401(2)(c) or as otherwise authorized by this chapter, any person found guilty of knowing possession of forty grams or less of marijuana is guilty of a misdemeanor. The prosecutor is encouraged to divert cases under this section for assessment, treatment, or other services.

Section 11

This section modifies existing section 69.41.030. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, deliver, or knowingly possess any legend drug except upon the order or prescription of a physician under chapter 18.71 RCW, an osteopathic physician and surgeon under chapter 18.57 RCW, an optometrist licensed under chapter 18.53 RCW who is certified by the optometry board under RCW 18.53.010, a dentist under chapter 18.32 RCW, a podiatric physician and surgeon under chapter 18.22 RCW, a veterinarian under chapter 18.92 RCW, a commissioned medical or dental officer in the United States armed forces or public health service in the discharge of his or her official duties, a duly licensed physician or dentist employed by the veterans administration in the discharge of his or her official duties, a registered nurse or advanced registered nurse practitioner under chapter 18.79 RCW when authorized by the nursing care quality assurance commission, a pharmacist licensed under chapter 18.64 RCW to the extent permitted by drug therapy guidelines or protocols established under RCW 18.64.011 and authorized by the commission and approved by a practitioner authorized to prescribe drugs, an osteopathic physician assistant under chapter 18.57A RCW when authorized by the board of osteopathic medicine and surgery, a physician assistant under chapter 18.71A RCW when authorized by the Washington medical commission, or any of the following professionals in any province of Canada that shares a common border with the state of Washington or in any state of the United States: A physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery or a physician licensed to practice osteopathic medicine and surgery, a dentist licensed to practice dentistry, a podiatric physician and surgeon licensed to practice podiatric medicine and surgery, a licensed advanced registered nurse practitioner, a licensed physician assistant, a licensed osteopathic physician assistant, or a veterinarian licensed to practice veterinary medicine: PROVIDED, HOWEVER, That the above provisions shall not apply to sale, delivery, or possession by drug wholesalers or drug manufacturers, or their agents or employees, or to any practitioner acting within the scope of his or her license, or to a common or contract carrier or warehouse operator, or any employee thereof, whose possession of any legend drug is in the usual course of business or employment: PROVIDED FURTHER, That nothing in this chapter or chapter 18.64 RCW shall prevent a family planning clinic that is under contract with the health care authority from selling, delivering, possessing, and dispensing commercially prepackaged oral contraceptives prescribed by authorized, licensed health care practitioners: PROVIDED FURTHER, That nothing in this chapter prohibits possession or delivery of legend drugs by an authorized collector or other person participating in the operation of a drug take-back program authorized in chapter 69.48 RCW.

  2. [Empty]

    1. A violation of this section involving the sale, delivery, or possession with intent to sell or deliver is a class B felony punishable according to chapter 9A.20 RCW.

    2. A violation of this section involving possession is a misdemeanor. The prosecutor is encouraged to divert such cases for assessment, treatment, or other services.

Section 12

This section modifies existing section 69.41.030. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. It shall be unlawful for any person to sell, deliver, or knowingly possess any legend drug except upon the order or prescription of a physician under chapter 18.71 RCW, an osteopathic physician and surgeon under chapter 18.57 RCW, an optometrist licensed under chapter 18.53 RCW who is certified by the optometry board under RCW 18.53.010, a dentist under chapter 18.32 RCW, a podiatric physician and surgeon under chapter 18.22 RCW, a veterinarian under chapter 18.92 RCW, a commissioned medical or dental officer in the United States armed forces or public health service in the discharge of his or her official duties, a duly licensed physician or dentist employed by the veterans administration in the discharge of his or her official duties, a registered nurse or advanced registered nurse practitioner under chapter 18.79 RCW when authorized by the nursing care quality assurance commission, a pharmacist licensed under chapter 18.64 RCW to the extent permitted by drug therapy guidelines or protocols established under RCW 18.64.011 and authorized by the commission and approved by a practitioner authorized to prescribe drugs, a physician assistant under chapter 18.71A RCW when authorized by the Washington medical commission, or any of the following professionals in any province of Canada that shares a common border with the state of Washington or in any state of the United States: A physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery or a physician licensed to practice osteopathic medicine and surgery, a dentist licensed to practice dentistry, a podiatric physician and surgeon licensed to practice podiatric medicine and surgery, a licensed advanced registered nurse practitioner, a licensed physician assistant, or a veterinarian licensed to practice veterinary medicine: PROVIDED, HOWEVER, That the above provisions shall not apply to sale, delivery, or possession by drug wholesalers or drug manufacturers, or their agents or employees, or to any practitioner acting within the scope of his or her license, or to a common or contract carrier or warehouse operator, or any employee thereof, whose possession of any legend drug is in the usual course of business or employment: PROVIDED FURTHER, That nothing in this chapter or chapter 18.64 RCW shall prevent a family planning clinic that is under contract with the health care authority from selling, delivering, possessing, and dispensing commercially prepackaged oral contraceptives prescribed by authorized, licensed health care practitioners: PROVIDED FURTHER, That nothing in this chapter prohibits possession or delivery of legend drugs by an authorized collector or other person participating in the operation of a drug take-back program authorized in chapter 69.48 RCW.

  2. [Empty]

    1. A violation of this section involving the sale, delivery, or possession with intent to sell or deliver is a class B felony punishable according to chapter 9A.20 RCW.

    2. A violation of this section involving possession is a misdemeanor. The prosecutor is encouraged to divert such cases for assessment, treatment, or other services.

Section 13

This section adds a new section to an existing chapter 10.31. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. For all individuals who otherwise would be subject to arrest for possession of a counterfeit substance under RCW 69.50.4011, possession of a controlled substance under RCW 69.50.4013, possession of 40 grams or less of marijuana under RCW 69.50.4014, or possession of a legend drug under RCW 69.41.030(2)(b), in lieu of jail booking and referral to the prosecutor, law enforcement shall offer a referral to assessment and services available pursuant to RCW 10.31.110 or other program or entity responsible for receiving referrals in lieu of legal system involvement, which may include the recovery navigator program established under section 2 of this act.

  2. If law enforcement agency records reflect that an individual has been diverted to referral for assessment and services twice or more previously, officers may, but are not required to, make additional diversion efforts.

  3. Nothing in this section precludes prosecutors from diverting or declining to file any charges for possession offenses that are referred under RCW 69.50.4011, 69.50.4013, 69.50.4014, or 69.41.030(2)(b) in the exercise of their discretion.

Section 14

This section modifies existing section 69.50.412. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. It is unlawful for any person to use drug paraphernalia to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, or prepare a controlled substance other than marijuana. Any person who violates this subsection is guilty of a misdemeanor.

  2. It is unlawful for any person to deliver, possess with intent to deliver, or manufacture with intent to deliver drug paraphernalia, knowing, or under circumstances where one reasonably should know, that it will be used to plant, propagate, cultivate, grow, harvest, manufacture, compound, convert, produce, process, or prepare a controlled substance other than marijuana. Any person who violates this subsection is guilty of a misdemeanor.

  3. Any person eighteen years of age or over who violates subsection (2) of this section by delivering drug paraphernalia to a person under eighteen years of age who is at least three years his or her junior is guilty of a gross misdemeanor.

  4. It is unlawful for any person to place in any newspaper, magazine, handbill, or other publication any advertisement, knowing, or under circumstances where one reasonably should know, that the purpose of the advertisement, in whole or in part, is to promote the sale of objects designed or intended for use as drug paraphernalia. Any person who violates this subsection is guilty of a misdemeanor.

  5. It is lawful for any person over the age of eighteen to possess sterile hypodermic syringes and needles for the purpose of reducing blood-borne diseases.

Section 15

This section modifies existing section 9.94A.518. Here is the modified chapter for context.

TABLE 4

DRUG OFFENSES

INCLUDED WITHIN EACH SERIOUSNESS LEVEL

III

Any felony offense under chapter 69.50 RCW with a deadly weapon special verdict under RCW 9.94A.825

Controlled Substance Homicide (RCW 69.50.415)

Delivery of imitation controlled substance by person eighteen or over to person under eighteen (RCW 69.52.030(2))

Involving a minor in drug dealing (RCW 69.50.4015)

Manufacture of methamphetamine (RCW 69.50.401(2)(b))

Over 18 and deliver heroin, methamphetamine, a narcotic from Schedule I or II, or flunitrazepam from Schedule IV to someone under 18 (RCW 69.50.406)

Over 18 and deliver narcotic from Schedule III, IV, or V or a nonnarcotic, except flunitrazepam or methamphetamine, from Schedule I-V to someone under 18 and 3 years junior (RCW 69.50.406)

Possession of Ephedrine, Pseudoephedrine, or Anhydrous Ammonia with intent to manufacture methamphetamine (RCW 69.50.440)

Selling for profit (controlled or counterfeit) any controlled substance (RCW 69.50.410)

II

Createor deliver a counterfeit controlled substance (RCW 69.50.4011(1)(a))

Deliver or possess with intent to deliver methamphetamine (RCW 69.50.401(2)(b))

Delivery of a material in lieu of a controlled substance (RCW 69.50.4012)

Maintaining a Dwelling or Place for Controlled Substances (RCW 69.50.402(1)(f))

Manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to deliver amphetamine (RCW 69.50.401(2)(b))

Manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to deliver narcotics from Schedule I or II or flunitrazepam from Schedule IV (RCW 69.50.401(2)(a))

Manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to deliver narcotics from Schedule III, IV, or V or nonnarcotics from Schedule I-V (except marijuana, amphetamine, methamphetamines, or flunitrazepam) (RCW 69.50.401(2) (c) through (e))

Manufacture, distribute, or possess with intent to distribute an imitation controlled substance (RCW 69.52.030(1))

I

Forged Prescription (RCW 69.41.020)

Forged Prescription for a Controlled Substance (RCW 69.50.403)

Manufacture, deliver, or possess with intent to deliver marijuana (RCW 69.50.401(2)(c))

Unlawful Use of Building for Drug Purposes (RCW 69.53.010)

Section 16

This section modifies existing section 13.40.0357. Here is the modified chapter for context.

A

Arson 1 (9A.48.020)

B+

B

Arson 2 (9A.48.030)

C

C

Reckless Burning 1 (9A.48.040)

D

D

Reckless Burning 2 (9A.48.050)

E

B

Malicious Mischief 1 (9A.48.070)

C

C

Malicious Mischief 2 (9A.48.080)

D

D

Malicious Mischief 3 (9A.48.090)

E

E

Tampering with Fire Alarm Apparatus (9.40.100)

E

E

Tampering with Fire Alarm Apparatus with Intent to Commit Arson (9.40.105)

E

A

Possession of Incendiary Device (9.40.120)

B+

A

Assault 1 (9A.36.011)

B+

B+

Assault 2 (9A.36.021)

C+

C+

Assault 3 (9A.36.031)

D+

D+

Assault 4 (9A.36.041)

E

B+

Drive-By Shooting (9A.36.045) committed at age 15 or under

C+

A++

Drive-By Shooting (9A.36.045) committed at age 16 or 17

A

D+

Reckless Endangerment (9A.36.050)

E

C+

Promoting Suicide Attempt (9A.36.060)

D+

D+

Coercion (9A.36.070)

E

C+

Custodial Assault (9A.36.100)

D+

B+

Burglary 1 (9A.52.020) committed at

age 15 or under

C+

A-

Burglary 1 (9A.52.020) committed at

age 16 or 17

B+

B

Residential Burglary (9A.52.025)

C

B

Burglary 2 (9A.52.030)

C

D

Burglary Tools (Possession of) (9A.52.060)

E

D

Criminal Trespass 1 (9A.52.070)

E

E

Criminal Trespass 2 (9A.52.080)

E

C

Mineral Trespass (78.44.330)

C

C

Vehicle Prowling 1 (9A.52.095)

D

D

Vehicle Prowling 2 (9A.52.100)

E

E

Possession/Consumption of Alcohol (66.44.270)

E

C

Illegally Obtaining Legend Drug (69.41.020)

D

C+

Sale, Delivery, Possession of Legend Drug with Intent to Sell (69.41.030(2)(a))

D+

E

Possession of Legend

Drug (69.41.030(2)(b))

E

B+

Violation of Uniform Controlled Substances Act - Narcotic, Methamphetamine, or Flunitrazepam Sale (69.50.401(2) (a) or (b))

B+

C

Violation of Uniform Controlled Substances Act - Nonnarcotic Sale (69.50.401(2)(c))

C

E

Possession of Marihuana <40 grams (69.50.4014)

E

C

Fraudulently Obtaining Controlled Substance (69.50.403)

C

C+

Sale of Controlled Substance for Profit (69.50.410)

C+

E

Unlawful Inhalation (9.47A.020)

E

B

Violation of Uniform Controlled Substances Act - Narcotic, Methamphetamine, or Flunitrazepam Counterfeit Substances (69.50.4011(2) (a) or (b))

B

C

Violation of Uniform Controlled Substances Act - Nonnarcotic Counterfeit Substances (69.50.4011(2) (c), (d), or (e))

C

E

Violation of Uniform Controlled Substances Act - Possession of a Controlled Substance (69.50.4013)

E

C

Violation of Uniform Controlled Substances Act - Possession of a Controlled Substance (69.50.4012)

C

B

Theft of Firearm (9A.56.300)

C

B

Possession of Stolen Firearm

(9A.56.310)

C

E

Carrying Loaded Pistol Without Permit (9.41.050)

E

C

Possession of Firearms by Minor (<18) (9.41.040(2)(a) (vi))

C

D+

Possession of Dangerous Weapon (9.41.250)

E

D

Intimidating Another Person by use of Weapon (9.41.270)

E

A+

Murder 1 (9A.32.030)

A

A+

Murder 2 (9A.32.050)

B+

B+

Manslaughter 1 (9A.32.060)

C+

C+

Manslaughter 2 (9A.32.070)

D+

B+

Vehicular Homicide (46.61.520)

C+

A

Kidnap 1 (9A.40.020)

B+

B+

Kidnap 2 (9A.40.030)

C+

C+

Unlawful Imprisonment (9A.40.040)

D+

D

Obstructing a Law Enforcement Officer (9A.76.020)

E

E

Resisting Arrest (9A.76.040)

E

B

Introducing Contraband 1 (9A.76.140)

C

C

Introducing Contraband 2 (9A.76.150)

D

E

Introducing Contraband 3 (9A.76.160)

E

B+

Intimidating a Public Servant (9A.76.180)

C+

B+

Intimidating a Witness (9A.72.110)

C+

C+

Criminal Mischief with Weapon (9A.84.010(2)(b))

D+

D+

Criminal Mischief Without Weapon (9A.84.010(2)(a))

E

E

Failure to Disperse (9A.84.020)

E

E

Disorderly Conduct (9A.84.030)

E

A

Rape 1 (9A.44.040)

B+

B++

Rape 2 (9A.44.050) committed at age 14 or under

B+

A-

Rape 2 (9A.44.050) committed at age 15 through age 17

B+

C+

Rape 3 (9A.44.060)

D+

B++

Rape of a Child 1 (9A.44.073)

committed at age 14 or under

B+

A-

Rape of a Child 1 (9A.44.073)

committed at age 15

B+

B+

Rape of a Child 2 (9A.44.076)

C+

B

Incest 1 (9A.64.020(1))

C

C

Incest 2 (9A.64.020(2))

D

D+

Indecent Exposure (Victim <14) (9A.88.010)

E

E

Indecent Exposure (Victim 14 or over) (9A.88.010)

E

B+

Promoting Prostitution 1 (9A.88.070)

C+

C+

Promoting Prostitution 2 (9A.88.080)

D+

E

O & A (Prostitution) (9A.88.030)

E

B+

Indecent Liberties (9A.44.100)

C+

B++

Child Molestation 1 (9A.44.083) committed at age 14 or under

B+

A-

Child Molestation 1 (9A.44.083) committed at age 15 through age 17

B+

B

Child Molestation 2 (9A.44.086)

C+

C

Failure to Register as a Sex Offender (9A.44.132)

D

B

Theft 1 (9A.56.030)

C

C

Theft 2 (9A.56.040)

D

D

Theft 3 (9A.56.050)

E

B

Theft of Livestock 1 and 2 (9A.56.080 and 9A.56.083)

C

C

Forgery (9A.60.020)

D

A

Robbery 1 (9A.56.200) committed at

age 15 or under

B+

A++

Robbery 1 (9A.56.200) committed at

age 16 or 17

A

B+

Robbery 2 (9A.56.210)

C+

B+

Extortion 1 (9A.56.120)

C+

C+

Extortion 2 (9A.56.130)

D+

C

Identity Theft 1 (9.35.020(2))

D

D

Identity Theft 2 (9.35.020(3))

E

D

Improperly Obtaining Financial Information (9.35.010)

E

B

Possession of a Stolen Vehicle (9A.56.068)

C

B

Possession of Stolen Property 1 (9A.56.150)

C

C

Possession of Stolen Property 2 (9A.56.160)

D

D

Possession of Stolen Property 3 (9A.56.170)

E

B

Taking Motor Vehicle Without Permission 1 (9A.56.070)

C

C

Taking Motor Vehicle Without Permission 2 (9A.56.075)

D

B

Theft of a Motor Vehicle (9A.56.065)

C

E

Driving Without a License (46.20.005)

E

B+

Hit and Run - Death (46.52.020(4)(a))

C+

C

Hit and Run - Injury (46.52.020(4)(b))

D

D

Hit and Run-Attended (46.52.020(5))

E

E

Hit and Run-Unattended (46.52.010)

E

C

Vehicular Assault (46.61.522)

D

C

Attempting to Elude Pursuing Police Vehicle (46.61.024)

D

E

Reckless Driving (46.61.500)

E

D

Driving While Under the Influence (46.61.502 and 46.61.504)

E

B+

Felony Driving While Under the Influence (46.61.502(6))

B

B+

Felony Physical Control of a Vehicle While Under the Influence (46.61.504(6))

B

B

Animal Cruelty 1 (16.52.205)

C

B

Bomb Threat (9.61.160)

C

C

Escape 1(9A.76.110)

C

C

Escape 2(9A.76.120)

C

D

Escape 3 (9A.76.130)

E

E

Obscene, Harassing, Etc., Phone Calls (9.61.230)

E

A

Other Offense Equivalent to an Adult Class A Felony

B+

B

Other Offense Equivalent to an Adult Class B Felony

C

C

Other Offense Equivalent to an Adult Class C Felony

D

D

Other Offense Equivalent to an Adult Gross Misdemeanor

E

E

Other Offense Equivalent to an Adult Misdemeanor

E

V

Violation of Order of Restitution, Community Supervision, or Confinement (13.40.200)

V

Escape 1 and 2 and Attempted Escape 1 and 2 are classed as C offenses and the standard range is established as follows:

1st escape or attempted escape during 12-month period - 28 days confinement

2nd escape or attempted escape during 12-month period - 8 weeks confinement

3rd and subsequent escape or attempted escape during 12-month period - 12 weeks confinement

If the court finds that a respondent has violated terms of an order, it may impose a penalty of up to 30 days of confinement.

This schedule must be used for juvenile offenders. The court may select sentencing option A, B, C, or D.

OPTION A

JUVENILE OFFENDER SENTENCING GRID

STANDARD RANGE

129 to 260 weeks for all category A++ offenses

A+

180 weeks to age 21 for all category A+ offenses

A

103-129 weeks for all category A offenses

A-

30-40 weeks

52-65 weeks

80-100 weeks

103-129 weeks

103-129 weeks

15-36 weeks

52-65 weeks

80-100 weeks

103-129 weeks

103-129 weeks

CURRENT

B+

15-36 weeks

15-36 weeks

52-65 weeks

80-100 weeks

103-129 weeks

OFFENSE

B

LS

LS

15-36 weeks

15-36 weeks

52-65 weeks

CATEGORY

C+

LS

LS

LS

15-36 weeks

15-36 weeks

C

LS

LS

LS

LS

15-36 weeks

D+

LS

LS

LS

LS

LS

D

LS

LS

LS

LS

LS

E

LS

LS

LS

LS

LS

PRIOR

0

1

2

3

4 or more

ADJUDICATIONS

NOTE: References in the grid to days or weeks mean periods of confinement. "LS" means "local sanctions" as defined in RCW 13.40.020.

  1. The vertical axis of the grid is the current offense category. The current offense category is determined by the offense of adjudication.

  2. The horizontal axis of the grid is the number of prior adjudications included in the juvenile's criminal history. Each prior felony adjudication shall count as one point. Each prior violation, misdemeanor, and gross misdemeanor adjudication shall count as 1/4 point. Fractional points shall be rounded down.

  3. The standard range disposition for each offense is determined by the intersection of the column defined by the prior adjudications and the row defined by the current offense category.

  4. RCW 13.40.180 applies if the offender is being sentenced for more than one offense.

  5. A current offense that is a violation is equivalent to an offense category of E. However, a disposition for a violation shall not include confinement.

  6. If the offender is subject to a standard range disposition involving confinement by the department, the court may impose the standard range and suspend the disposition on condition that the offender comply with one or more local sanctions and any educational or treatment requirement. The treatment programs provided to the offender must be either research-based best practice programs as identified by the Washington state institute for public policy or the joint legislative audit and review committee, or for chemical dependency treatment programs or services, they must be evidence-based or research-based best practice programs. For the purposes of this subsection:

    1. "Evidence-based" means a program or practice that has had multiple site random controlled trials across heterogeneous populations demonstrating that the program or practice is effective for the population; and

    2. "Research-based" means a program or practice that has some research demonstrating effectiveness, but that does not yet meet the standard of evidence-based practices.

  7. If the offender fails to comply with the suspended disposition, the court may impose sanctions pursuant to RCW 13.40.200 or may revoke the suspended disposition and order the disposition's execution.

  8. An offender is ineligible for the suspended disposition option under this section if the offender:

    1. Is adjudicated of an A+ or A++ offense;

    2. Is fourteen years of age or older and is adjudicated of one or more of the following offenses:

      1. A class A offense, or an attempt, conspiracy, or solicitation to commit a class A offense;

      2. Manslaughter in the first degree (RCW 9A.32.060);

      3. Assault in the second degree (RCW 9A.36.021), extortion in the first degree (RCW 9A.56.120), kidnapping in the second degree (RCW 9A.40.030), drive-by shooting (RCW 9A.36.045), vehicular homicide (RCW 46.61.520), hit and run death (RCW 46.52.020(4)(a)), or manslaughter 2 (RCW 9A.32.070); or

      4. Violation of the uniform controlled substances act (RCW 69.50.401(2) (a) and (b)), when the offense includes infliction of bodily harm upon another or when during the commission or immediate withdrawal from the offense the respondent was armed with a deadly weapon;

    3. Is ordered to serve a disposition for a firearm violation under RCW 13.40.193;

    4. Is adjudicated of a sex offense as defined in RCW 9.94A.030; or

    5. Has a prior option B disposition.

If the juvenile offender is subject to a standard range disposition of local sanctions or 15 to 36 weeks of confinement and has not committed a B++ or B+ offense, the court may impose a disposition under RCW 13.40.160(4) and 13.40.165.

If the court determines that a disposition under option A, B, or C would effectuate a manifest injustice, the court shall impose a disposition outside the standard range under RCW 13.40.160(2).

Section 17

This section modifies existing section 2.24.010. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. There may be appointed in each county or judicial district, by the judges of the superior court having jurisdiction therein, one or more court commissioners for said county or judicial district. Each such commissioner shall be a citizen of the United States and shall hold the office during the pleasure of the judges making the appointment.

  2. [Empty]

    1. There may be appointed in counties with a population of more than four hundred thousand, by the presiding judge of the superior court having jurisdiction therein, one or more attorneys to act as criminal commissioners to assist the superior court in disposing of adult criminal cases. Such criminal commissioners shall have power, authority, and jurisdiction, concurrent with the superior court and the judges thereof, in adult criminal cases, to preside over arraignments, preliminary appearances, initial extradition hearings, and noncompliance proceedings pursuant to RCW 9.94A.6333 or 9.94B.040; accept pleas if authorized by local court rules; appoint counsel; make determinations of probable cause; set, amend, and review conditions of pretrial release; set bail; set trial and hearing dates; authorize continuances; accept waivers of the right to speedy trial; and authorize and issue search warrants and orders to intercept, monitor, or record wired or wireless telecommunications or for the installation of electronic taps or other devices to include, but not be limited to, vehicle global positioning system or other mobile tracking devices with all the powers conferred upon the judge of the superior court in such matters.

    2. Criminal commissioners shall also have the authority to conduct resentencing hearings and to vacate convictions related to State v. Blake, No. 96873-0 (Feb. 25, 2021). Criminal commissioners may be appointed for this purpose regardless of the population of the county served by the appointing court.

    3. The county legislative authority must approve the creation of criminal commissioner positions.

Section 18

This section modifies existing section 2.24.040. Here is the modified chapter for context.

Such court commissioner shall have power, authority, and jurisdiction, concurrent with the superior court and the judge thereof, in the following particulars:

  1. To hear and determine all matters in probate, to make and issue all proper orders therein, and to issue citations in all cases where same are authorized by the probate statutes of this state.

  2. To grant and enter defaults and enter judgment thereon.

  3. To issue temporary restraining orders and temporary injunctions, and to fix and approve bonds thereon.

  4. To act as referee in all matters and actions referred to him or her by the superior court as such, with all the powers now conferred upon referees by law.

  5. To hear and determine all proceedings supplemental to execution, with all the powers conferred upon the judge of the superior court in such matters.

  6. To hear and determine all petitions for the adoption of children and for the dissolution of incorporations.

  7. To hear and determine all applications for the commitment of any person to the hospital for the insane, with all the powers of the superior court in such matters: PROVIDED, That in cases where a jury is demanded, same shall be referred to the superior court for trial.

  8. To hear and determine all complaints for the commitments of minors with all powers conferred upon the superior court in such matters.

  9. To hear and determine ex parte and uncontested civil matters of any nature.

  10. To grant adjournments, administer oaths, preserve order, compel attendance of witnesses, and to punish for contempts in the refusal to obey or the neglect of the court commissioner's lawful orders made in any matter before the court commissioner as fully as the judge of the superior court.

  11. To take acknowledgments and proofs of deeds, mortgages and all other instruments requiring acknowledgment under the laws of this state, and to take affidavits and depositions in all cases.

  12. To provide an official seal, upon which shall be engraved the words "Court Commissioner," and the name of the county for which he or she may be appointed, and to authenticate his official acts therewith in all cases where same is necessary.

  13. To charge and collect, for his or her own use, the same fees for the official performance of official acts mentioned in subsections (4) and (11) of this section as are provided by law for referees and notaries public.

  14. To hear and determine small claims appeals as provided in chapter 12.36 RCW.

  15. In adult criminal cases, to preside over arraignments, preliminary appearances, initial extradition hearings, and noncompliance proceedings pursuant to RCW 9.94A.6333 or 9.94B.040; accept pleas if authorized by local court rules; appoint counsel; make determinations of probable cause; set, amend, and review conditions of pretrial release; set bail; set trial and hearing dates; authorize continuances; accept waivers of the right to speedy trial**; and conduct resentencing hearings and hearings to vacate convictions related to State v. Blake, No. 96873-0 (Feb. 25, 2021)**.

Section 19

This section modifies existing section 9.94A.728. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. No person serving a sentence imposed pursuant to this chapter and committed to the custody of the department shall leave the confines of the correctional facility or be released prior to the expiration of the sentence except as follows:

    1. An offender may earn early release time as authorized by RCW 9.94A.729;

    2. An offender may leave a correctional facility pursuant to an authorized furlough or leave of absence. In addition, offenders may leave a correctional facility when in the custody of a corrections officer or officers;

    3. [Empty]

      1. The secretary may authorize an extraordinary medical placement for an offender when all of the following conditions exist:

(A) The offender has a medical condition that is serious and is expected to require costly care or treatment;

(B) The offender poses a low risk to the community because he or she is currently physically incapacitated due to age or the medical condition or is expected to be so at the time of release; and

(C) It is expected that granting the extraordinary medical placement will result in a cost savings to the state.

    ii. An offender sentenced to death or to life imprisonment without the possibility of release or parole is not eligible for an extraordinary medical placement.

    iii. The secretary shall require electronic monitoring for all offenders in extraordinary medical placement unless the electronic monitoring equipment interferes with the function of the offender's medical equipment or results in the loss of funding for the offender's medical care, in which case, an alternative type of monitoring shall be utilized. The secretary shall specify who shall provide the monitoring services and the terms under which the monitoring shall be performed.

    iv. The secretary may revoke an extraordinary medical placement under this subsection (1)(c) at any time.

v. Persistent offenders are not eligible for extraordinary medical placement;

d. The governor, upon recommendation from the clemency and pardons board, may grant an extraordinary release for reasons of serious health problems, senility, advanced age, extraordinary meritorious acts, or other extraordinary circumstances;

e. No more than the final twelve months of the offender's term of confinement may be served in partial confinement for aiding the offender with: Finding work as part of the work release program under chapter 72.65 RCW; or reestablishing himself or herself in the community as part of the parenting program in RCW 9.94A.6551. This is in addition to that period of earned early release time that may be exchanged for partial confinement pursuant to RCW 9.94A.729(5)(d);

f. No more than the final six months of the offender's term of confinement may be served in partial confinement as home detention as part of the graduated reentry program developed by the department under RCW 9.94A.733;

g. The governor may pardon any offender;

h. The department may release an offender from confinement any time within ten days before a release date calculated under this section;

i. An offender may leave a correctional facility prior to completion of his or her sentence if the sentence has been reduced as provided in RCW 9.94A.870;

j. Notwithstanding any other provisions of this section, an offender sentenced for a felony crime listed in RCW 9.94A.540 as subject to a mandatory minimum sentence of total confinement shall not be released from total confinement before the completion of the listed mandatory minimum sentence for that felony crime of conviction unless allowed under RCW 9.94A.540; and

k. Any person convicted of one or more crimes committed prior to the person's eighteenth birthday may be released from confinement pursuant to RCW 9.94A.730.
  1. Notwithstanding any other provision of this section, an offender entitled to vacation of a conviction or the recalculation of his or her offender score pursuant to State v. Blake, No. 96873-0 (Feb. 25, 2021), may be released from confinement pursuant to a court order if the offender has already served a period of confinement that exceeds his or her new standard range. This provision does not create an independent right to release from confinement prior to resentencing.

  2. Offenders residing in a juvenile correctional facility placement pursuant to RCW 72.01.410(1)(a) are not subject to the limitations in this section.

Section 20

This section modifies existing section 10.64.110. Here is the modified chapter for context.

  1. Following June 15, 1977, except as provided in subsection (3) of this section, there shall be affixed to the original of every judgment and sentence of a felony conviction in every court in this state and every order adjudicating a juvenile to be a delinquent based upon conduct which would be a felony if committed by an adult, a fingerprint of the defendant or juvenile who is the subject of the order. When requested by the clerk of the court, the actual affixing of fingerprints shall be done by a representative of the office of the county sheriff.

  2. The clerk of the court shall attest that the fingerprints appearing on the judgment in sentence, order of adjudication of delinquency, or docket, is that of the individual who is the subject of the judgment or conviction, order, or docket entry.

  3. Amended judgment and sentences issued pursuant to State v. Blake, No. 96873-0 (Feb. 25, 2021), are exempt from the fingerprinting requirements in subsection (1) of this section when there are no additional offenses of conviction from the original judgment and sentence and the defendant is in custody in a correctional facility. In such cases, the amended judgment and sentence shall reference the original judgment and sentence and the fingerprints affixed thereto.

Section 21

The State v. Blake reimbursement account is created in the state treasury. Moneys in the account may be spent only after appropriation. Expenditures from the account may be used only for state and local government costs resulting from the supreme court's decision in State v. Blake, No. 96873-0 (Feb. 25, 2021), and to reimburse individuals for legal financial obligations paid in connection with sentences that have been invalidated as a result of the decision.

Section 22

The appropriations in this section are provided to the health care authority community behavioral health program and are subject to the following conditions and limitations:

  1. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $25,000,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $20,000,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to contract with behavioral health administrative service organizations to implement the statewide recovery navigator program established in section 2 of this act and for related technical assistance to support this implementation. This includes funding for recovery navigator teams to provide community-based outreach and case management services based on the law enforcement assisted diversion model and for technical assistance support from the law enforcement assisted diversion national support bureau.

  2. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $1,673,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; $3,114,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023; and $3,890,000, from the general fund-federal account for the fiscal biennium ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to implement clubhouse services in every region of the state.

  3. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $5,000,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $7,500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to implement the homeless outreach stabilization team program, pursuant to section 5(1) of this act.

  4. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $2,500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $2,500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to expand efforts to provide opioid use disorder medication in city, county, regional, and tribal jails.

  5. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to expand opioid treatment network programs for people with co-occurring opioid and stimulant use disorder.

  6. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $1,400,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $1,400,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for behavioral health administrative service organizations to develop regional recovery navigator program plans pursuant to section 2 of this act and to establish positions focusing on regional planning to improve access to and quality of regional behavioral health services with a focus on integrated care.

  7. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $75,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $75,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to contract with an organization with expertise in supporting efforts to increase access to and improve quality in recovery housing and recovery residences. This funding shall be used to increase recovery housing availability through partnership with private landlords, increase accreditation of recovery residences statewide, operate a grievance process for resolving challenges with recovery residences, and conduct a recovery capital outcomes assessment for individuals living in recovery residences.

  8. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to provide short-term housing vouchers for individuals with substance use disorders.

  9. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $250,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $250,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to issue grants for substance use disorder family navigator services.

  10. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $200,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $200,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the authority to convene and provide staff and contracted services support to the recovery oversight committee established in section 1 of this act.

  11. The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $2,565,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $2,565,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for staff and contracted services support for the authority to develop and implement the recovery services plan established in section 1 of this act and to carry out other requirements of this act. Within these amounts, funding is provided for the authority to:

    1. Establish an occupational nurse consultant position within the authority to provide contract oversight, accountability, performance improvement activities, and to ensure medicaid managed care organization plan compliance with provisions in law and contract related to care transitions work with local jails.

    2. Establish a position within the authority to create and oversee a program to initiate and support emergency department programs for inducing medications for patients with opioid use disorder paired with a referral to community-based outreach and case management programs.

Section 23

The appropriation in this section is provided to the administrative office of the courts and is subject to the following conditions and limitations:

The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $2,250,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $2,250,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely to fund grants for therapeutic courts operated by municipalities and district courts. The administrative office of the courts must allocate grant funding based upon a formula established by the administrative office of the courts. The formula must distribute the grant funding equitably between those therapeutic courts located east of the crest of the Cascade mountains and those therapeutic courts located west of the crest of the Cascade mountains. Multiple jurisdictions served by a single municipal court or district court may apply for funds as a single entity. Local jurisdictions receiving grant funding for therapeutic courts must use funding to identify individuals before the courts with substance use disorders or other behavioral health needs and engage those individuals with community-based therapeutic interventions.

Section 24

The appropriation in this section is provided to the department of commerce and is subject to the following conditions and limitations:

The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $500,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $1,000,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the department to provide grants for the operational costs of new staffed recovery residences which serve individuals with substance use disorders who require more support than a level 1 recovery residence.

Section 25

The appropriation in this section is provided to the criminal justice training commission and is subject to the following conditions and limitations:

The following sums, or so much thereof as may be necessary, are each appropriated: $150,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2022; and $150,000 from the state general fund for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2023. The amounts in this subsection are provided solely for the commission to compensate trainer time to deliver the curriculum related to law enforcement interactions with persons with a substance use disorder pursuant to section 7 of this act.

Section 30

If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected.


Created by @tannewt. Contribute on GitHub.